Perennials

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 How-To Guide on Growing Perennials 

If you have the knack for an all flowery flowerbed, perennials are some of the bunch you should consider. Perennials are plants that provide the flowers throughout the year except in harsh winters. Perennials are in full bloom during summer and autumn and color and bloom during this season. If planning to plant the perennials, here are considerations to know. At this point, it is wise to note that this does not include woody plants like trees and shrubs.

 There are two types of the plants; Perennials are the evergreens and semi-evergreens and the herbaceous perennials whose stems die down and the roots service winter then come to life when thawed. Perennials are great because they last forever and once, they are planted all you have to do is maintain them consistently. 

 Cultivation

 The cultivation of perennials is pretty easy. Planting them takes little effort as they only require to be planted in the warmer weather but not close to winter so that they do not die out in their youth. If the winter catches on, you can build a greenhouse for their protection. Stake the flowers as soon as they are long enough to keep them up straight and stop them from flopping. 

 Propagating perennials is done by either raising them from seeds or cuttings. There are thousands of species of plants to choose from, so depending on your taste and preference you can select the ones that suit your method of propagation.

 If you are thinking about pruning, there are only two times you are recommended to do so, even though it is not a requirement. The first is cutting back that happens after the harsh seasons when you remove the dead stems and the Chelsea chop which is removing the flopped stems.

 Due to the vast number of species available, perennials can grow in several soils like chalky, clay, and sandy soils. 

 Problems you might encounter

 Perennials might be some of the best plants but they also have their weak spots and one of them is cold weather. You need to take care of them during the harsh winters if possible. If the plants are also under a tree, they might not flourish as well as the ones on the open field. Perennials are also prone to rabbits, so you need to take measures to ensure spring does not leave your foliage exposed to the feeding frenzy.

 Diseases

 Perennials are pretty good on their own, but if you notice that they are dying, drying out or their leaves are browning, they might be suffering from phytophthora, a condition that causes root rot. Root out the affected plants or find the necessary remedy before they infect the rest. When the plants are also young, they are prone to many pests and slugs so you might want to take care of that by using the right remedies like a little lime to keep them at bay. The changing color of leaves like them turning yellow or purple shades indicates the perennials might be nutrient deficient.