Hairy Phlox

Hairy Phlox

Status: In Stock
$9.99
Description:
Hairy Phlox is a hardy flowering plant that is native to the forests and fields of the southeastern United States. The Hairy Phlox thrives in dry, well-drained soils, as well as clay, gravel, and sandy soil, and can handle both sun and shade with eas

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Hairy Phlox - Phlox amoena

Hairy Phlox
The Hairy Phlox, or Phlox amoena, is a gorgeous flowering plant native to the southeastern United States. Found throughout the regions south of Kentucky, anywhere between the Mississippi River and Florida, the Hairy Phlox, reaching heights of a foot or more, has vivid, green leaves and stems. The thickness of the plant's stem provides a lush backdrop to its eye-catching blooms. Bright pink or purple in color, the flowers appear each spring. Due to its overall colorfulness, the Hairy Phlox is a beautiful addition to both ornamental gardens and more natural landscapes. Adaptable to a variety of soils, including sandy terrains and rocky hillsides, the Phlox is easy to cultivate and requires minimal upkeep. Hairy Phlox have a strong scent and come in various shades of bright pink and purple. They are tubular and have five petals on each flower, which grow in clusters on the ends of the stems. The stamens of the flowers are internal, meaning they are not visible the way the stamens of Daffodils or Lilies are. The flowers attract birds as well as pollinators such as bees and butterflies, which makes them an important part of any landscape or garden.
 
The leaves of the Hairy Phlox are long and skinny and grow on opposite sides of the stem from each other. The leaves and stem are also covered with a distinctive hairy fuzz, which is where the Hairy Phlox gets its name. This helps in identifying these particular flowers, as many species of Phlox look quite similar and are easy to mistake for one another. These plants can be easily grown from seeds, and should be planted in early spring. Plant them anywhere from 9" to 15" apart, depending on your available space. Once the plants are established, they can be divided and transplanted with little trouble. Dividing should take place in early spring to give the plants time to adapt.