Black Oak Tree

Black Oak Tree

Status: In Stock
$26.99
Description:
Latin Name- Quercus Kelloggii Hardy Planting Zone-3-8 Mature Height- 70-80 ft Width-40-50 ft Sun or Shade- Prefers Full Sun

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BLACK OAK TREE - QUERCUS KELLOGGII

Black Oaks grow well in moist, well-drained, rich soil, but they can tolerate dry, poor soil, and are often found growing on windy ridges and slopes. Habitat of the Black Oak Tree The Black Oak tree, Quercus velutina, is native to the eastern and central United States and is hardy in Zones 3-8. It can be found from southern Georgia and northern Florida north to New York and Ontario, and as far west as Texas, Nebraska, and Minnesota. They are slow growing trees, which may live up to 200 years. Characteristics of the Black Oak Tree The Black Oak is so named for its deeply ridged, black bark. It is a large tree with a potential trunk diameter of 2 to3 feet, and a potential height of 60 to 80 feet or more. The shape of the crown can vary from round to irregular, and the tree has a spread of 40 to 50 feet, providing ample shade. The dark green leaves are large and narrow, varying from 5 to 9 inches long, with deeply indented multiple lobes that have a single bristle at the end of each lobe. The underside of the leaves bears fine hairs, which make them soft and velvety, hence the species name, velutina, which derives from Latin word, vellus, meaning fleecy or wool-like. In the fall the leaves turn to deep orange and red. In areas where the soil is alkaline, the fall leaf color may be yellow due to a condition called chlorosis. Regardless of the color, the Black Oak tree adds beautiful fall color to any fall landscape. If you carefully dig a small spot beneath the outer bark, the inner bark has a characteristic yellow color and bitter taste due to the presence of tannins. The tannins of this tree were once used commercially in curing animal hides and in making yellow dyes. The wood of the Black Oak resembles that of the Red Oak; it is hard and strong, but not as fine-grained as wood from the Red Oak. Lumber from both species is used in construction, furniture, and flooring. These trees produce acorns every two years which are inedible for humans due to their bitter taste, but are a wonderful source of food for wildlife including birds, squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons, mice and voles; deer may graze on the young twigs and shoots.